Entries by Malcolm Bracken

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead.

Wednesday saw my 40th Birthday, and to celebrate I went to see Tom Stoppard’s brilliant Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead at the Old Vic with a Chum. While Daniel Radcliffe & Joshua Maguire lead, the show is stolen by a magisterial performance by David Haig as The Player, a sort of luvvie-pimp-cum-impresario who holds the […]

Minimum Wages, Immigration, Culture and Education.

Net migration to the UK has run at hundreds of thousands a year for decades, of which about a quarter since 2004 has been “A8 countries”, Poland, the Baltic states, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia and Hungary, another quarter from ‘Core EU’ and the rest from non-EU countries, mainly India, Pakistan and West Africa. 13% of […]

Why the Blue Passport Matters.

People have spent the day on Twitter saying “why does the colour of a passport matter”? While the Daily Express is cheering the return of the Blue Passport to the rafters. For most people capable of abstract thought, this is a mystifying detail, the importance of which to their opponents is utterly baffling. Of course, […]

Nicola and Theresa. Phwooar.

The Daily Mail’s headline “Legs-it” about Scottish First Minister and British Prime Minister Theresa May’s shapely legs was pathetic. But remember, the Mail is written by women, for women, and women judge each other, all the time, harshly and vindictively. Judged especially harshly are women more accomplished or better looking than the average Daily Mail […]

On Class, Culture and the New Politics

The two tribes of politics, broadly the Tory and Labour parties divided over the 20th Century principally on the matter of economics. Simplifying: Tories preferred market solutions to state planning, and preferred lower taxes and less generous state spending. The Labour party, which when it abandoned clause IV, surrendered on the economic question, not coincidentally […]

The End of A ‘Belle Époque’. 1991-2016.

The interlocking webs of policy which ‘politics’ seeks to knit are complicated. Whole books can be written on how two individual policies interact. PhDs in Economics are awarded for small snapshots of the whole cloth. Most people don’t have the time to keep abreast of developments or read sufficient history to understand why some policies […]

Boston Dynamics and The Late Sir Terry Pratchett

Everyone knows how driverless cars will work: they will be like ordinary cars, except you read a book rather than acting as pilot. And so, people’s understanding of what a technology can do is clouded by what the old technology it replaces does. Which means people without imagination, Head of IBM Thomas Watson, for example, […]